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T here is certainly value in reading a book from cover to cover to allow children to enjoy a complete story. However, research shows that engaging preschool children in interactive reading experiences is more effective in promot – ing children’s lang uage and literacy learning than simply reading books aloud to them (Morrow, Freitag, & Gambrell 2009; Wasik & Iannone-Campbell 2013). Using particular strategies or interactive behaviors while reading aloud with children builds their skills in specific areas. When sharing books individually with children, or in large or small groups, adults can make minor adjustments in their approach that have a big impact on children’s lang uage understanding. As stated by Justice and Pence, “The object of book-reading sessions should not be to get through the book or only to read the words on the page but rather to create an enjoyable, high-quality, and sensitive interaction” (20 05 , 1 2). What is interactive reading? In interactive book reading, adults and children are active participants in a conversation, or dialog ue, about the book. Adults plan the experience to support, challenge, and extend children’s literacy skills. Three essential character – istics of high-quality reading interactions are (1) adult sen – sitivity and responsiveness, (2) child engagement, and (3) repetitive reading (Justice & Pence 2005). As sensitive and responsive adults, teachers sit face-to-face with children to form a physical and emotional connection during the read – ing experience. They observe children’s verbal responses, facial expressions, body posture, and eye gaze to determine engagement, motivation, and understanding. Teachers are patient, giving children plenty of time to form and deliver their responses. And teachers are good listeners, paying close attention to what children say so they can respond appropriately and extend the conversation. Kathy Barclay ®2, 3 © Bob Ebbesen 78 Preschool Conducting Interactive Reading Experiences Young Children November 2014 To maximize children’s engagement during a read- aloud, teachers let children set the pace of interactions, pause to look at pictures, talk about the characters and events in stories, and explore related topics of interest, in – cluding children’s own experiences. When teachers encour – age children to label and discuss pictures and to ask and answer questions during reading, they help children take ownership of the text. In interactive reading experiences, effective teachers read aloud the same books again and again—perhaps daily during a single week. Multiple readings create a sense of fa – miliarity for children, helping them become more confident in their knowledge of books and print, and fostering their learning of new concepts and skills in a well-known context. Choosing books To nurture young children’s interest in books and reading, teachers need to communicate through actions and words that reading and sharing books are enjoyable and highly valued experiences. It is important for teachers to think carefully about book choices since “the type of book that is read aloud influences the nature of the discussion that follows” (Morrow & Gambrell 2004, 4). To locate the best books to share, explore a variety of high-quality fiction and informational books designed especially for children ages 3 to 5. Keep in mind timeless topics of universal appeal for most children—friendship, growing up, animals, weather— and the interests, lang uages, cultures, families, and com – munities of the individual children in your setting. Simple picture books with large print lend themselves to discussions about concepts of print, alphabet knowl – edge, and phonological awareness. Storybooks containing a well-developed plot, interesting characters, and a clear sequence of events all promote conversations that foster children’s growing narrative abilities. Informational books make excellent read-aloud choices as research shows that reading aloud nonfiction books tends to result in more ex – tended dialog ue (Justice & Pence 2005; Price, van Kleeck, & Huberty 2009; Swanson et al. 2011). (See www.naeyc.org/ yc/columns/readingchair for The Reading Chair column’s archive, 2005 –2014.) Supporting language and literacy skills Interactive reading experiences provide an opportunity to expand children’s receptive (hearing) and expressive (speaking) vocabularies, their emergent reading and writ – ing abilities, and their interests. The following sections offer suggestions and activities for fostering children’s narrative, word, print, and alphabet knowledge, and phono – logical awareness. Although the strategies are effective during read-aloud experiences with the whole group, reading with small groups and individuals leads to greater and more meaningful interactions and learning because children have a greater opportunity to share their thinking about the story. At the same time, adults are more able to informally assess children’s understanding and adjust their presentation of, and questions about, the story to better meet individual children’s lang uage and literacy needs. Narrative knowledge Young children’s narrative skills—their ability to convey a story or retell a familiar event in logical order and with sufficient detail—are linked to social and academic success (Spencer & Slocum 2010; Colozzo et al. 2011). As chil – dren listen to, talk about, and retell stories they’ve heard repeatedly, they develop the ability to tell and retell real or imaginary events in their own past, present, or future. Over time, children’s narratives move from a simple relating of events or ideas to better organized and more detailed stories. During read-aloud experiences, teachers can lead children in talking about basic story elements: characters, setting, and order of events (Morrow, Freitag, & Gambrell 2009; Swanson et al. 2011). Interactive reading experiences begin with a focus on building narrative knowledge as children talk about and make predictions about a new book, listen to prove or dis – prove their predictions, and discuss questions that promote lang uage and thought. Teachers can ask questions before, during, and after story reading. While it is common to ask comprehension questions to determine whether children have listened to the story, carefully constructed higher- level questions prompt children to develop more thoughtful responses, to speak about feelings and ideas, and to observe story events, details, and relationships that they might otherwise have missed. For example, after reading the books Elmer (1989), by David McKee, and T h e H i p p o – N O T- amus (2004), by Tony and Jan Payne, the teacher prompts children to consider and talk about similarities and differ – ences between the two stories, including the characters, by asking questions such as, “How are Elmer, the patchwork elephant, and Portly, the hippopotamus, alike?” and “How are they different?” It’s important to practice reading a book aloud before reading it to children. This prepares teachers to read with greater expression (so they sound like the characters in the About the AuthorKathy Barclay is the professional development manager for Rowland Reading Foundation, a nonprofit organization devoted solely to early literacy. She is coauthor of The Everything Guide to Informational Literature, K–2: Best Texts, Best Practices . [email protected] 79 Simple picture books with large print lend themselves to discussions about concepts of print, alphabet knowledge, and phonological awareness. November 2014 Young Children story) and identify appropriate places to pause in the read – ing so children can ask questions, talk about events in the story, and make predictions about what might happen next. Such conversations help children build understanding and gain language skills. For example, a teacher might read Kitty Cat, Kitty Cat, Are You Waking Up? (2008), by Bill Martin Jr. and Michael Sampson, to support children’s narrative development. Large illustrations accompany bold, large print on each page. Kitty Cat’s mother gently prompts him as he slowly follows the morning routine—awakening, getting dressed, eating breakfast, then getting into the car to go to school. (See “Promoting Narrative Knowledge.”) Word knowledge Studies show that children’s literature contains rich words and sentence structures that are not found in most of the conversations that happen at home or in the classroom (Beck, McKeown, & Kucan 2013). In addition, when adults talk with children during book readings, they often use more complex sentences and diverse vocabulary than in their other lang uage interactions with children (Justice & Pence 2005; Wasik & Iannone-Campbell 2013). By intro – ducing children to as many new words as they can, teachers boost children’s listening and speaking vocabularies and subsequent comprehension and composition abilities. To help children gain word knowledge during book-sharing experiences, keep in mind that children are ready to learn new words if they understand the underlying concepts. For example, if children demonstrate their understanding of the concept big , then teachers know they are ready to learn synonyms such as large , huge , and g igantic . Children learn new words more readily when they hear them repeatedly in meaningful contexts. Share a book in which new words occur several times throughout the story, and conduct multiple readings of the same book. After reading, return to particularly interesting parts of the text or to a new word that appeared in the story. Discuss it in greater depth, helping the children make connections between the book and their lives. “Using the words deliber – ately with children throughout the day, such as in conversa – tions and activities, provides repeated exposure and helps develop meaning across contexts” (Collins 2012, 69). Promoting Narrative Knowledge Ms. harn: We have a new book to read today. (Pointing to different book cover elements.) The title of the book is Kitty Cat, Kitty Cat, Are You Waking Up? look at the pictur e on the cover of the book. Where do you think Kitty Cat is? harrison: In bed. Ms. harn: I think you’re right. This does look like it could be a bed. Who do you think might be asking “Kitty Cat, Kitty Cat, are you waking up?” Maria: His mommy. Ms. harn: Good idea. Who wakes you up in the morning? (Ms. Harn allows time for children’s responses.) let’s listen carefully to find out who is asking Kitty Cat if he is waking up, and what Kitty Cat does when he gets up. (Ms. Harn shows the picture on page one.) Were you right? Children: Ye s ! Ms. harn: (Ms. Harn then shows the next page.) What is Kitty Cat doing now? da’Sean: He’s sitting up in his bed. Ms. harn: If we were there, what would we hear Kitty Cat doing when he is “practicing his purr”? Have you ever heard a cat purr? What does that sound like? (Ms. Harn pauses for children’s responses and then turns the page.) What do you think Kitty Cat is going to do next? Erebka: He’s going to get dressed. Ms. harn: What makes you think that? Ashley: I see his clothes. Ms. harn: Yes, you can see the clothes in the picture. Do you get dressed after you get out of bed? (Ms. Harn pauses for responses from children.) Children: Ye s ! Ms. harn: Kitty Cat says he’s looking for his socks. What do you think he will put on after he puts on his socks? da’Sean: His shoes! Ms. harn: let’s see if you are right. (Ms. Harn turns the page.) What do you see in this picture? Is he putting on his shoes? Children: Ye s ! © Karen Phillips 80 Young Children November 2014 The steps in “Rereading to Promote Word Knowledge” demonstrate a plan to help young children make connec – tions and build word knowledge through an interactive rereading of The Big Storm: A Very Sogg y Counting Book (2009), by Nancy Tafuri. In the book 10 little woodland animals hurry to find shelter in a storm and spend all night huddled together in the hollow of a tree. After the initial book-reading, the teacher then returns to the book at that time or later in the day to help children expand their vocab – ularies through in-depth discussions of specific words. Print knowledge Sharing books is a natural way to build children’s interest in, and knowledge about, the print in books and in their environment. When conducting read-alouds, teachers can intentionally help children understand the print conven – tions of left-to-right directionality and the spacing that appears between words and between lines of text. When teachers point to each word as they read it aloud, children learn to track print; that is, they learn to associate spoken and written words. They begin to recognize familiar let – ters, understand that letters are used to form words, and recall some words that appear frequently in print. To help children develop print knowledge, point to the print and ask questions or make comments about specific Rereading to Promote Word Knowledge 1. Read the first page of The Big Storm: A Very Soggy Counting Book . Point to the opening in the hill and ask, “Do you remember what this is called?” (It is a hollow.) Explain that a hollow is an open place, a place with nothing in it. Talk about other items shown on the page that may be unfamiliar to the children. 2. Read the first line of print on the next page: “ leaves started to swirl.” Ask, “What are the leaves doing? What do you think is making them swirl ?” Invite the children to stand and swirl like the leaves. 3. After reading “10 critters huddled together, tight and snug,” mention that the author refers to the animals as critters . Ask children to look at the way the animals are pictured on the page. Point out that they are huddled together, standing or sitting very close to one another. Ask the children to huddle together. Then ask them to recall whether the animals get wet from the rain. ( no.) Point out that the author said they are snug —they are dry and warm in the hill hollow. Talk about where chil – dren might feel snug, such as in their beds. 81 Experiencing Nature With Young Children Awakening Delight, Curiosity, and a Sense of Stewardship Alice Sterling Honig O rder online at www.naeyc.org or call 800-424-2460 option 5 L earning to care for and about nature begins with developing and supporting children’s sense of awe and appreciation of nature. Discover ways to integrate nature learning into children’s everyday experiences, instilling a passion for the outdoors and sparking learning in all areas. Item 1128 List $16 Member $12.80 (20% savings) NEW! November 2014 Young Children letters, words, and sentences. Point out the front cover, back cover, print, and illustrations. Use print-related vocabulary to call attention to the way books are organized: cover , title , author , illustrator , letter , word , sentence , f ront , back , beg in – ning , and end . (See “Sample Interactive Reading: Print Knowledge.”) Alphabet knowledge Children’s understanding of letters and the sounds they make is greatly affected by the number of book-sharing ex – periences they have had before entering kindergarten and first grade. Many children with higher levels of alphabet knowledge who have had more experiences with the alpha – bet across genres, or types, of literature—fiction, nonfiction, poetry—are better able to benefit from phonics instruction, and they leave kindergarten better prepared for first grade (Snow, Burns, & Griffin 1998; Turnbull & Justice 2012). Interactive reading experiences that focus attention on the alphabet help children understand that there are uppercase and lowercase letters and that letters stand for sounds. Through repeated exposure they begin to recognize more and more letters and to match letters with their most com – mon sounds. (See “Sample Interactive Reading: Alphabet Knowledge.”) Phonological awareness This skill involves understanding that words are made up of a sequence of sounds. While reading aloud any book extends children’s sensitivities to the sound structure of oral lang uage, reading aloud predictable books that contain rhythm and rhyme is especially well suited to develop – ing phonological awareness. Before children can benefit from phonics instruction in kindergarten and first grade, they need to acquire specific phonological and phonemic awareness skills, the latter of which involves the ability to blend, segment, and manipulate individual sounds in words. The ability to (1) rhyme, (2) recognize when words have matching beginning or ending sounds ( dog /door , bat / boot ), Sample Interactive Reading: Alphabet Knowledge A lesson following an interactive reading of Kitty Cat, Kitty Cat, Are You Waking Up? might include some – thing like the following: Ms. harn: let’s look at the title of this book (pointing to each word as it is read): Kitty Cat, Kitty Cat, Are You Wak – ing Up? I see two big Ks in this title (pointing to each one). I see two Cs in the title. Who can find one and point to it? (Calling on a volunteer.) Another? (Calling on another volunteer to find the second C.) As we read the book, let’s watch for these letters. Sample Interactive Reading: Print Knowledge A n interactive reading of Kitty Cat, Kitty Cat, Are You Waking Up? might begin this way: Ms. harn: The name of the book is Kitty Cat, Kitty Cat, Are You Waking Up? The name of the book is called the title . Here are the words in the title (pointing to each word as she reads it): Kitty Cat, Kitty Cat, Are You Waking Up? I heard the words Kitty and Cat two times. look, here’s Kitty (pointing to the word) and here it is again (pointing to the second time the word Kitty appears). And here’s the word Cat (point – ing to the word) and here it is again (pointing to the second time the word cat appears ). The names of the authors are Bill Martin Jr. and Michael Sampson. They wrote the book, so they are the authors. Their names are right here (pointing to the names on the cover). There is another name on the cover (pointing to the illustrator’s name)— laura J. Bryant. She is the illustra – tor, the person who drew the pictures. © Ellen B. Senisi 82 Young Children November 2014 (3) segment words into syllables ( kit-ty , but-ter-cup ), and (4) blend and segment individual sounds in simple one-syllable words ( /c/ /a/ /t/ = cat ; cat = /c/ /a/ /t/ ) are important prerequisites for both reading and spelling (Snow, Burns, & Griffin 1998; Yopp & Yopp 2009; Schickedanz & Collins 201 3). Adults can engage children in lang uage-play games using key words and sentences from familiar books. For example, before playing the game Up and Down, remind the children that Kitty Cat didn’t want to get out of bed, so he stood on his head. The words bed and head sound alike because they both have – ed, so we say they rhyme. Hold up two pictures and ask the children to stand up if they rhyme and to remain seated if they do not rhyme. Call out pairs of words from the book ( socks /blocks ; bed /shoes ) and observe closely to see who can and cannot quickly identify whether the two words rhyme. (For more games, see “Extending the Phonological Awareness Activity.”) Conclusion The interactive reading experience goes beyond the adult reading and the child listening. While just reading books with children is certainly beneficial, adults can use the strategies presented during their read-aloud experiences to maximize children’s literacy learning. Through interac – tive readings, teachers help children develop knowledge of print and books, expand their vocabularies and sentence structures, build alphabet knowledge and phonological awareness, and increase their understanding of and ability to talk about story elements and to retell events in sequen – tial order. So, what will you do with a good book? References Beck, I.L., M.G. McKeown, & L. Kucan. 2013. Bringing Words to Life: Robust Vocabulary Instruction. 2nd ed. New York: Guilford. Collins, M.F. 2012. “Sagacious, Sophisticated, and Sedulous: The Im – portance of Discussing 50-Cent Words With Preschoolers.” Young Children 67 (5): 66–71. Colozzo, P., R.B. Gillam, M. Wood, R.D. Schnell, & J.R. Johnston. 2011. “Content and Form in the Narratives of Children With Specific Language Impairment.” Journal of Speech, Language, and Hear – ing Research 54 (6): 1609–27. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC3793011. Justice, L.M., & K.L. Pence. 2005. Scaffolding With Storybooks: A Guide for Enhancing Young Children’s Language and Literacy Achievement. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Morrow, L.M., E. Freitag, & L.B. Gambrell. 2009. Using Children’s Literature in Preschool to Develop Comprehension: Understanding and Enjoying Books. 2nd ed. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Morrow, L.M., & L.B. Gambrell. 2004. Using Children’s Literature in Pre – school: Comprehending and Enjoying Books. Newark: International Reading Association. Price, L.H., A. van Kleeck, & C.J. Huberty. 2009. “Talk During Book Sharing Between Parents and Preschool Children: A Comparison Between Storybook and Expository Book Conditions.” Reading Research Quarterly 44 (2): 171–94. Schickedanz, J.A., & M.F. Collins. 2013. So Much More Than the ABCs: The Early Phases of Reading and Writing. Washington, DC: NAEYC. Snow, C.E., M.S. Burns, & P. Griffin, eds. 1998. Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children. Report of the National Research Council. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=6023&page=R1. Spencer, T.D., & T.A. Slocum. 2010. “The Effect of a Narrative Interven – tion on Story Retelling and Personal Story Generation Skills of Preschoolers With Risk Factors and Narrative Language Delays.” Journal of Early Intervention 32 (3): 178–99. Swanson, E.A., J. Wanzek, Y. Petscher, S. Vaughn, J. Heckert, C. Cava – naugh, G. Kraft, & K. Tackett. 2011. “A Synthesis of Read-Aloud In – terventions on Early Reading Outcomes Among Preschool Through Third Graders At Risk for Reading Difficulties.” Journal of Learning Disabilities 44 (3): 258–75. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC3319370. Turnbull, K.L.P., & L.M. Justice. 2012. Language Development From Theory to Practice. 2nd ed. Boston: Pearson. Wasik, B.A., & C. Iannone-Campbell. 2013. “Developing Vocabulary Through Purposeful, Strategic Conversations.” The Reading Teacher 66 (2): 321–32. Yopp, H.K., & R.H. Yopp. 2009. “Phonological Awareness Is Child’s Play!” Young Children 64 (1): 12–21. www.naeyc.org/files/yc/ file/200901/BTJPhonologicalAwareness.pdf. Extending the Phonological Awareness Activity O nce children are able to hear likenesses and differences in words that rhyme, they are ready to play odd one out. Begin the game by saying, “ now I’m going to hold up three pictures and you tell me which one doesn’t belong. Which one doesn’t rhyme with the other two? (1) cat /hat / dish , (2) dish /fish /cat .” Continue in this manner using other pictures from the book. Teachers can also use games to help children build phonemic awareness—for example: “ let’s play a word game. I’ll stretch out the sounds in a word, like a rubber band, and you tell me what word I’m saying: /b/ /e/ /d/ ( bed ); /f/ /ur/ ( fur ); /s/ /l/ /ee/ /p/ ( sleep ) .” There are other ways to use the book Kitty Cat, Kitty Cat, Are You Waking Up? to develop phonological awareness. ■n After reading the first page, say, “There are two words on this page that rhyme. listen: up/butter – cup . They rhyme because they both have /up/.” ■n After reading the third page, ask, “What is Kitty Cat doing now? (Practicing his purr.) Purr rhymes with another word on this page. What other word has /ur/ in it? ( Fur .)” Copyright © 2014 by the national Association for the Education of Young Children. See P ermissions and Reprints online at www.naeyc.org/yc/permissions. 83 November 2014 Young Children Copyright ofYC: Young Children isthe property ofNational Association forthe Education of Young Children anditscontent maynotbecopied oremailed tomultiple sitesorposted to a listserv without thecopyright holder’sexpresswrittenpermission. However,usersmay print, download, oremail articles forindividual use.
Hello, I need to revise a work that I did before 4:00 and if needed add information if necessary. I will provide the rubric etc. Free Plagiarism No information from another article.
5 Points 4 points 3 Points 2 Points Critical Analysis of Articles The topic sentence is strong, detailed and focused. The summary is organized and includes important aspects of the research including the participants (who was involved), what was done (research methods), and the findings. The topic sentence is clear, but needs to be more focused. The summary is organized, but is missing some important aspects including the participants (who was involved), what was done (research methods), and the findings. The topic sentence is vague. It is difficult to make sense of what the article is about The summary lacks organization and important aspects including the participants (who was involved), what was done (research methods), and the findings. The topic sentence is not clear. The summary is short and vague. It lacks important details which makes it difficult to understand. Writing Conventions APA formatting is used correctly throughout the draft. Uses consistent agreement between parts of speech. No errors in mechanics, capitalization, punctuation, or spelling. APA formatting is used throughout the draft. There are occasional errors. Use the website to guide your revisions, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ Occasional errors in agreement between parts of speech. Some errors in mechanics, capitalization, punctuation, or spelling. APA formatting is not used. Use the website to guide your revisions, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ Inconsistent agreement between parts of speech. Several errors in mechanics, capitalization, punctuation, or spelling. APA formatting is not used. Use the website to guide your revisions, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ Parts of speech show lack of agreement. Frequent errors in mechanics, capitalization, punctuation, or spelling.
Hello, I need to revise a work that I did before 4:00 and if needed add information if necessary. I will provide the rubric etc. Free Plagiarism No information from another article.
5 Points 4 points 3 Points 2 Points Critical Analysis of Articles The topic sentence is strong, detailed and focused. The summary is organized and includes important aspects of the research including the participants (who was involved), what was done (research methods), and the findings. The topic sentence is clear, but needs to be more focused. The summary is organized, but is missing some important aspects including the participants (who was involved), what was done (research methods), and the findings. The topic sentence is vague. It is difficult to make sense of what the article is about The summary lacks organization and important aspects including the participants (who was involved), what was done (research methods), and the findings. The topic sentence is not clear. The summary is short and vague. It lacks important details which makes it difficult to understand. Writing Conventions APA formatting is used correctly throughout the draft. Uses consistent agreement between parts of speech. No errors in mechanics, capitalization, punctuation, or spelling. APA formatting is used throughout the draft. There are occasional errors. Use the website to guide your revisions, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ Occasional errors in agreement between parts of speech. Some errors in mechanics, capitalization, punctuation, or spelling. APA formatting is not used. Use the website to guide your revisions, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ Inconsistent agreement between parts of speech. Several errors in mechanics, capitalization, punctuation, or spelling. APA formatting is not used. Use the website to guide your revisions, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ Parts of speech show lack of agreement. Frequent errors in mechanics, capitalization, punctuation, or spelling.
Hello, I need to revise a work that I did before 4:00 and if needed add information if necessary. I will provide the rubric etc. Free Plagiarism No information from another article.
In the article, Conducting Interactive Reading Experiences, Barclay. (2009), the author argues that is important to create a connection with the children when reading aloud to them. The author explains how beneficial reading aloud could improve the child language literature learning. This article provides details information how the reader can reach out to their listeners by giving different reading formats where they can help children understand the reading. According, to Justice and Pence (2005), there is three majors’ strategies that helps the children comprehends what is the reading about, the first one is the connection the teacher can make with the students, second, how the child is participating in the reading, and third the teacher needs to reread the story more than once for the child could understand what the story is about. The teacher must find an appropriate book to read to children under 5 years old. once the teacher has read the story is essential for the children to work in small groups, this will help to express themselves and find out who of the group might have the same opinion. Using big print books could guide the student to understand what’s the book is about. Students learn more when they hear the words more than once and are able to make connections, talk about characters feeling, and

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