Hello, I have attached an example and the rubric Thank you

Place your order today and enjoy professional academic writing services—From simple class assignments to dissertations. Give us a chance to impress you.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper

Hello, I have attached an example and the rubric

Thank you

Hello, I have attached an example and the rubric Thank you
Purpose NR449 Evidence-Based Practice Skills Module: Nutrition To encourage critical thinking, problem solving, and collaboration through the use of evidence-based practice studies. Course outcomes: This assignment enables the student to meet the following course outcomes. CO 1: Examine the sources of knowledge that contribute to professional nursing practice. (PO 7) CO 2: Apply research principles to the interpretation of the content of published research studies. (POs 4 and 8) CO 3: Identify ethical issues common to research involving human subjects. (PO 6) CO 4: Evaluate published nursing research for credibility and clinical significance related to evidence-based practice. (POs 4 and 8) CO 5: Recognize the role of research findings in evidence-based practice. (POs 7 and 8) Due date: Your faculty member will inform you when this assignment is due. The Late Assignment Policy applies to this assignment. Total points possible: 100 points Preparing the assignment Follow these guidelines when completing this assignment. Speak with your faculty member if you have questions. Computer with internet access. Recommend using Firefox browser and clearing your cookies and cache if you are accessing ATI on laptop or desktop computer. Log into ATI, “My ATI”, and select the “Apply” tab. Click on Skills Module 3.0 and title “Nutrition.” Click on the “Begin Lesson” tab. Open the “Evidence-Based Research” tab on the left side. There is one (1) study under the Evidence-Based Practice tab. You may review the entire module, but this is not a priority for this assignment. Other main topics and accompanying studies are listed in the table below. Choose one of the main topics from the table and then choose one (1) article for review under that main topic. Read the article chosen from the table below and answer one (1) of the topic questions listed. What methods can be used to assess nutritional status? What methods can be used to identify those at risk for malnutrition? What specific health conditions increase the risk of malnutrition? What associations exist between nutritional status and health outcomes? What type of interventions improve adherence to recommendations on nutritional intake? Create a 2-3 page scholarly paper which supports the topic question you selected. Search for a current research article (less than 5 years) to support the topic question selected. The 2-3 page limit does not include title and reference pages. Main Topic: Person-centered feeding care. Article for review: Bell, C., Lopez, R., Mahendra, N., Tamai, A., Davis, J., Amella, E., & Masaki, K. (2016). Person-centered feeding care: A protocol to re-introduce oral feeding for nursing home patients with tube feeding. Journal of Nutrition & Health Aging, 20(6), 621-627. https://doi:10.1007/s12603-016-0699-9. Main Topic: Evaluating nutritional status. Articles for review: Vereecken, C., Covents, M., Maes, L., & Moyson, T. (2013). Formative evaluation of the feedback component of children’s and adolescents’ nutrition assessment and advice on the web (CANAA-W) among parents of school children. Public Health Nutrition, 16(1), 15-26. doi:10.1017/S1368980012003448. Vyncke, K, Cruz, Fernandez E., Fajó-Pascual, M., Cuenca-García, M., De Keyzer, W., Gonzalez-Gross. M., Moreno, L., Beghin, L., Breidenassel, C., Kersting, M., Albers, U., Diethelm, K., Mouratidou, T., Grammatikaki, E., Vriedt, T., Marcos, A., Bammann, K., Bornhortst, C., Leclercq, C., Manios, Y….Huybrechts, I. (2013). Validation of the diet quality index for adolescents by comparison with biomarkers, nutrient and food intakes: the HELENA study. British Journal of Nutrition, 109(11), 2067-78. https://doi:10.1017/S000711451200414X. Main Topic: Identifying those at risk for malnutrition. Articles for review: Isenring, E., Banks, M., Ferguson, M., & Bauer, J. (2012). Beyond malnutrition screening: Appropriate methods to guide nutrition care for aged care residents. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 112(3), 376-381. https://doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2011.09.038. Tsai, A., Chang, T., Wang, Y., & Liao, C. (2010). Population-specific short-form mini nutritional assessment with body mass index or calf circumference can predict risk of malnutrition in community-living or institutionalized elderly people in taiwan. Journal American Dietetic Association, 110(9), 1328-1334. https://doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2010.06.003. PMID: 20800124. Platek, M. E., Popp, J. V., Possinger, C. S., Denysschen, C. A., Horvath, P., & Brown, J. K. (2011). Comparison of the prevalence of malnutrition diagnosis in head and neck, gastrointestinal, and lung cancer patients by 3 classification methods. Cancer Nursing, 34(5), 410–416. https://doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0b013e318206b013. Main Topic: Malnutrition associated with specific health conditions. Articles for review: Paul, B., Singh, T., Paul, G., Jain, D., Singh, G., Kaushal, S., & Chhina, R. (2019). Prevalence of malnutrition in Parkinson’s disease and correlation with gastrointestinal symptoms. Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology, 22(4), 447-452. https://doi: 10.4103/aian.AIAN_349_18  Rios, T. C., de Oliveira, L. P., da Costa, M. L., da Silva Baqueiro Boulhosa, R. S., Roriz, A. K., Ramos, L. B., & Bueno, A. A. (2021). A poorer nutritional status impacts quality of life in a sample population of elderly cancer patients. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 19(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12955-021-01735-7  Jackson, A. A. (2018). Identifying children at risk of malnutrition. Nutrition Journal, 17(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12937-018-0392-4 Main Topic: Outcomes associated with nutritional status. Articles for review: Ruiz, A. J., Buitrago, G., Rodríguez, N., Gómez, G., Sulo, S., Gómez, C., Partridge, J., Misas, J., Dennis, R., Alba, M. J., Chaves-Santiago, W., & Araque, C. (2019). Clinical and economic outcomes associated with malnutrition in hospitalized patients. Clinical Nutrition, 38(3), 1310–1316. https://doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2018.05.016  Harbottle L. (2019). The effect of nutrition on older people’s mental health. British Journal of Community Nursing, 24, S12–S16. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup7.S12  Jung, S. E., Bishop, A. J., Kim, M., Hermann, J., Kim, G., & Lawrence, J. (2017). Nutritional status of rural older adults is linked to physical and emotional health. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics, 117(6), 851–858. https://doi:10.1016/j.jand.2017.01.013 Main Topic: Interventions to improve nutritional status. Article for review: Santo, K., Hyun, K., Keizer, L., Thiagalingam, A., Hillis, G., Chalmers, J., Redfern, J., & Chow, C. (2018). The effects of a lifestyle-focused text-messaging intervention on adherence to dietary guideline recommendations in patients with coronary heart disease: An analysis of the TEXT ME study. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 15(45). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-018-0677-1  Lessard, L. M., Wilkins, K., Rose-Malm, J., & Mazzocchi, M. C. (2020). The health status of the early care and education workforce in the USA: A scoping review of the evidence and current practice. Public Health Reviews (2107-6952), 41(1), 1–17. https://doi:10.1186/s40985-019-0117-z DeHaven, M. J., Gimpel, N. A., Gutierrez, D., Kitzman, C. H., & Revens, K. (2020). Designing health care: A community health science solution for reducing health disparities by integrating social determinants and the effects of place. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 26(5), 1564–1572. 6. The paper must include the following headings (see rubric for criteria under each heading): Introduction and Key Points (5 Points) Choose one of the assigned articles located under the main topics in the table above; selects and identifies one of the questions listed in 5a. – 5e. Defines the topic and question States why it is a problem Information presented in logical sequence Article Search (5 Points) Conduct an article search – a good resource is the Chamberlain Library. If you start the assignment early, the library has resources/support to help find an appropriate article. The article must be current (less than 5 years) and from a credible resource (peer-reviewed or a reputable organization). List the database that you searched and list the terms and methods used Number of articles located – this is the number of articles that showed up in the results list for the terms you used Source outside of ATI module used – the article used cannot be the one that is listed in the ATI Nutrition Module Article Findings (25 Points) – this is based on the article you found in 6(b) How it addresses the main topic Type of research conducted in the article selected (e.g., quantitative, qualitative, etc.) Findings of research conducted in the article Why this article was chosen Evidence for Practice (25 Points) Summary of evidence How it will improve practice How this evidence will decrease a gap to practice Any concerns or weaknesses located in the evidence Sharing of Evidence (20 Points) Who would you share the information with? How would you share this information? What resources would you need to accomplish this sharing of evidence? Why would it be important to share this evidence with the nursing profession? Conclusion (5 Points) Summarizes the theme of the paper Information presented in logical sequence All key points addressed Conclusion shows depth of understanding of topic APA Style (10 Points) APA style used properly for citations APA style used properly for references APA style used properly for quotations All references are cited, and all citations have references *NOTE: Must adhere to current APA guidelines and formatting. Writing Mechanics (5 Points) No spelling errors No grammatical errors, including verb tense and word usage No writing errors, including sentence structure, and formatting Must be all original work Your instructor will provide guidance on the best way to submit this assignment. For writing assistance visit the Academic Support -> Writing Center Please note that your instructor may provide you with additional assessments to determine that you fully understand the concepts learned in the review module. Grading Rubric Criteria are met when the student’s application of knowledge demonstrates achievement of the required criteria for this assignment. Assignment Section and Required Criteria (Points possible/% of total points available) Highest Level of Performance High Level of Performance Satisfactory Level of Performance Unsatisfactory Level of Performance Section not present in paper Introduction and Key Points (5 points) (6a in Guidelines) 5 points 4 points 3 points 1 point 0 points Required criteria Choose one of the assigned topics and identifies one of the questions Defines the topic and question States why it is a problem Information presented in logical sequence Includes 4 requirements for section. Includes 3 requirements for section. Includes 2 requirements for section. Includes 1 requirement for section. No requirements for this section presented. Article Search (5 points) (6b in Guidelines) 5 points 4 points 3 points 1 point 0 points Required criteria Current (less than 5 years) and credible resource Database search – terms and methods used Number of articles located Source outside of ATI module used Includes 4 requirements for section. Includes 3 requirements for section. Includes 2 requirements for section. Includes 1 requirement for section. No requirements for this section presented. Article Findings (25 points) (6c in Guidelines) 25 points 22 points 20 points 10 points 0 points Required criteria How it addresses the topic Type of research conducted Findings of research Why this article was chosen Includes 4 requirements for section. Includes 3 requirements for section. Includes 2 requirements for section. Includes 1 requirement for section. No requirements for this section presented. Assignment Section and Required Criteria (Points possible/% of total points available) Highest Level of Performance High Level of Performance Satisfactory Level of Performance Unsatisfactory Level of Performance Section not present in paper Evidence for Practice (25 points) (6d in Guidelines) 25 points 22 points 20 points 10 points 0 points Required Criteria Summary of evidence How it will improve practice How this evidence will decrease a gap to practice Any concerns or weaknesses located in the evidence Includes 4 requirements for section. Includes 3 requirements for section. Includes 2 requirements for section. Includes 1 requirement for section. No requirements for this section presented. Sharing of Evidence (20 points) (6e in Guidelines) 20 points 17 points 15 points 10 points 0 points Required Criteria 1. Who would you share the information with? How would you share this information? What resources would you need to accomplish this sharing of evidence? Why would it be important to share this evidence with the nursing profession? Includes 4 requirements for section. Includes 4 requirements for section. Includes 4 requirements for section. Includes 4 requirements for section. Includes 4 requirements for section. Assignment Section and Required Criteria (Points possible/% of total points available) Highest Level of Performance High Level of Performance Satisfactory Level of Performance Unsatisfactory Level of Performance Section not present in paper Conclusion (5 points) (6f in Guidelines) 5 points 4 points 3 points 1 point 0 points Required Criteria Summarizes the theme of the paper Information presented in logical sequence All key points addressed Conclusion shows depth of understanding of topic Includes 4 requirements for section. Includes 3 requirements for section. Includes 2 requirements for section. Includes 1 requirement for section. No requirements for this section presented. APA Style (10 points) (6g in Guidelines) 10 points 8 points 7 points 4 points 0 points Required criteria APA style used properly for citations APA style used properly for references APA style used properly for quotations All references are cited, and all citations have references *NOTE: Must adhere to current APA guidelines and formatting. Includes 4 requirements for section. Includes 3 requirements for section. Includes 2 requirements for section. Includes 1 requirement for section. No requirements for this section presented. Writing Mechanics (5 points) (6h in Guidelines) 5 points 4 points 3 points 1 point 0 points Required criteria No spelling errors No grammatical errors, including verb tense and word usage No writing errors, including sentence structure, and formatting Must be all original work Includes 4 requirements for section. Includes 3 requirements for section. Includes 2 requirements for section. Includes 1 requirement for section. No requirements for this section presented. Total Points Possible = 100 points NR449_Skills_Module_Nutrition ®2022 Chamberlain University. All Rights Reserved 3
Hello, I have attached an example and the rubric Thank you
12 The Prevention and Management of Chronic Diseases in Adults Student Name Chamberlain University College of Nursing Evidence Based Practice NR449 Professor Cynthia Butterman April 15th, 2023. The Prevention and Management of Chronic Diseases in Adults Chronic diseases present one of the major public health concerns across the US. Today, six in every ten adults in the US have at least one chronic condition. Four in every ten adults are also diagnosed with two or more chronic conditions (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2022). These chronic conditions have a significant impact on the health and well-being of individuals, the stability of families, the overall wellness of the community, and significant socioeconomic implications for the nation. For instance, a bigger percentage (up to 75%) of the annual health budget of the US ($4.1 trillion) is usually directed toward the management and treatment of chronic conditions (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2022). On average, this implies each individual with a chronic condition incurs at least $5,300 in healthcare costs every year (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2022). Additionally, chronic diseases are the leading causes of mortality/death, including early and preventable mortalities in adults. These preventable and early mortalities have a significant implication on the socioeconomic status of families and households, especially where the individual with the condition is the primary income earner within that household. These socioeconomic implications range from increased levels of dependency within a household, lower household income, and higher poverty levels that may affect the academic progression of other members of the family (Bush et al., 2020). In essence, preventable mortalities and comorbidities in chronic conditions are a major influence on the existence of cyclical poverty within households, hence a significant factor in determining the socioeconomic stability of households now and into the future (Neuhouser, 2019). Notably, heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis, obesity, and Alzheimer’s disease are the major chronic diseases that present among adults in the US. Heart disease and stroke alone account for up to one-third of total deaths in the US, while cancer accounts for up to 600,000 every year (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2022). The comorbidities associated with these conditions have far more reaching socioeconomic implications for individuals, families, communities, and the public health system. However, a common attribute with chronic diseases among adults in the US is that they are largely influenced by modifiable risk factors such as poor dietary habits, limited physical activity/sedentary lifestyles as well as other risky habits such as excessive alcohol use and smoking. Nutritional or dietary habits stand out as a major risk factor for chronic conditions, their progression, and the emergence of additional comorbidities among US adults (Bush et al., 2020). Innovative approaches towards dietary and nutritional management are gaining fast approval and utilization due to advances in technology. These innovative approaches, if well implemented can help prevent chronic diseases, associated early mortalities, and comorbidities assure of improved quality of life among US adults.  Article Search            The PubMed database was utilized for article search. The keywords utilized for the search included chronic diseases, adults, prevention, health promotion, early mortality, comorbidities, monitoring, self-management, nutrition, diet, and risk factors. To conduct the search, the keywords were combined to develop key phrases. Boolean functions AND/OR were applied in combining the search (Houser, 2023). Some key phrases that were developed included “chronic diseases AND adults AND nutrition OR diet”, “chronic diseases AND prevention AND early mortalities”, “nutrition OR diet AND risk factors AND chronic diseases” and so on. Cumulatively, eight phrases were developed, and the corresponding eight searches generated a total of 382 articles. The search was refined for time relevance with duration since publication set to 2019 (5 years). Other criteria used to refine the search included full articles only, journal articles, and peer reviewed. This refined search generated a total of 9 articles. The selection of the required article for the task herein was left to the discretion of the researcher.  Article Findings El Khoury et al. (2019) utilize a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature to examine the efficacy of dietary mobile applications on the nutritional outcomes among adults with chronic conditions. In an era of significant technological advancements in healthcare, mobile applications are proving to be a great asset in improving health promotion, health education, and enhancing self-care and self-management in individuals and families. El Khoury et al. (2019) identified articles from several databases including PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL. A total of 18,649 articles were generated in the search. The search was limited to only articles published from January 1, 2007, until November 15, 2007. The PRISMA technique was applied in the systematic review. The key measures that were being sought included nutritional outcomes among adults using the dietary mobile apps, nutrition-focused physical findings, anthropometric measurements such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference, as well as relevant biochemical and clinical data related to nutrition. The final choice of the 22 articles utilized in the systematic review was only intervention studies. The study findings based on pool estimates indicated that individuals that utilized the dietary mobile applications demonstrated a significantly greater decrease in waist circumference, weight, and energy intake compared to those in the control groups. More than three-quarters (75%) of the interventional studies utilized in the systematic review demonstrated that the use of dietary mobile applications had a positive impact or change on the users across at least one of the nutritional outcomes that were being measured. Additionally, more than 50% of the articles reported medium-level or large-level impact or effect of the dietary mobile applications on changes in the outcomes being measured. The greatest impact of the dietary mobile apps based on pool estimates was recorded on the measure of self-monitoring of dietary patterns and improvement or changes in self-care and self-management related to diet and weight loss. The choice of article by El Khoury et al. (2019) was based on the reality that the complications of most chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, heart diseases, and stroke can be managed or controlled with effective lifestyle changes, especially diet, and nutrition. However, the absence of objective real-time data to inform adult patients with these chronic conditions on their health status is usually a challenge, thus leading to a poor or untimely response. Thus, by the time actual interventions for the prevention of the progression of the condition are initiated, irreversible changes in organ function and system disruption have already occurred leading to disease progression and the associated comorbidities or early mortality. Healthcare innovations such as dietary mobile apps are filling the current gap in response and timeliness of literature while also serving to improve the knowledge of patients regarding the possible or expected changes in their nutritional status. This article describes the effectiveness of dietary mobile apps on adults with chronic conditions which aligns with the topic herein which seeks to explore better or more effective techniques for the prevention of chronic diseases and/or their progression among adults via dietary or nutritional techniques (El Khoury et al., 2019).  Evidence for Practice Across the 22 articles utilized, nine studies utilized commercial applications available on the play store while the other studies utilized applications that had been developed for research purposes. The pooled estimates across these two groups demonstrated that whether for commercial or research purposes, mobile apps had a significant influence on the nutritional outcomes of adults with chronic conditions (El Khoury et al., 2019). For instance, in studies that reported on applications focused on diabetes and hypertension, the two categories of the applications reported significant improvements in the dietary/food history of the participants. Traditionally, the challenge of managing chronic conditions among adults has been linked to the absence of objective data to inform lifestyle changes or initiate other immediate interventions (Bush et al., 2020). Patients have traditionally relied on healthcare providers to monitor their health status and nutritional outcomes. The limitation of the traditional approach is that healthcare providers cannot accurately monitor the behaviors or habits of individuals away from the hospital settings, especially concerning dietary and nutritional habits. However, innovations such as dietary mobile apps address the gap in monitoring behaviors and habits such as dietary choices, history, and physical activity levels that could have otherwise been determined subjectively in the past. With objective data on habits and behaviors, the patient and the healthcare provider are allowed to collaborate in developing personalized nutritional and dietary patterns that align with the dynamic health needs imposed by the condition or risk for the condition (El Khoury et al., 2019). The primary limitation of the studies utilized is that they all relied on year-long monitoring of the participants (El Khoury et al., 2019). In reality, patients with chronic diseases require lifelong management of their lifestyle, habits, and behaviors, especially concerning diet and nutrition. The studies demonstrate the efficacy of diet mobile apps for short-term and mid-term assessment of nutritional outcomes in patients. There is limited evidence on the long-term utilization and efficacy of mobile apps, which would inform whether such apps have any relevance to the overall changes in behavior and lifestyle of individuals in the long term (El Khoury et al., 2019). Further, the studies fail to effectively report on the challenges in the utilization of mobile apps related to lacking patient knowledge of technological devices or applications. The optimal value of these applications is dependent on the patient’s knowledge of technology and the ability to apply all functionalities or modules of the applications. There is a need for further studies to establish how lacking knowledge and skill in technology could affect the utilization and efficacy of dietary mobile apps among adults with chronic conditions (El Khoury et al., 2019).  Sharing of Evidence   I would share the information with healthcare providers managing patients with chronic conditions, nutritionists, community health nurses, and patients with chronic conditions. Healthcare providers, nutritionists, and community health nurses are essential to creating awareness of such dietary mobile apps and their relevance to improving nutritional outcomes and overall quality of life among their patients. These professionals would also be useful in reviewing the applications and providing feedback on what would need to be altered, improved, integrated, or eliminated to further optimize the applications (Houser, 2023). Patients with chronic diseases would benefit from the information since they are the target group for these tools. I would consider social media groups via applications such as WhatsApp and Facebook to share information with a specific provider or patient networks or groups. I would also consider designing and producing pamphlets and brochures to distribute to relevant individuals, professionals, and stakeholders involved in chronic disease management and prevention. A smartphone installed with social media applications as well as a personal computer to design the brochures would be useful resources to enhance sharing of information. I would also require printing papers and a printer device to produce hard copies of the pamphlets and brochures to distribute to target groups or individuals.  Conclusion Chronic diseases among adults in the US present significant health and socioeconomic implications. A majority of prevalent chronic conditions diagnosed in adults in the US are preventable while their progression and related complications can be controlled to assure these adults of a quality life amid their condition. One of the key strategies for effective prevention and control of chronic disease progression is via nutritional and dietary approaches (Neuhouser, 2019). However, patients and healthcare providers require objective data on dietary and nutritional patterns to develop personalized dietary plans for patients to limit, prevent or control chronic diseases and their comorbidities (Bush et al., 2020). Dietary mobile applications prove to be an effective strategy to provide the required objective data that can enhance the design of the desired personalized nutritional plans. Dietary mobile apps also enhance patients’ self-monitoring and effective planning of diets that align with the diagnosed chronic condition. While the short-term and mid-term efficacy of dietary mobile apps is not in doubt, there is a need to explore the long-term efficacy of the mobile apps to align with the lifelong nutritional-related prevention, management, and treatment of chronic conditions among adults (El Khoury et al., 2019).  References Bush, C. L., Blumberg, J. B., El-Sohemy, A., Minich, D. M., Ordovás, J. M., Reed, D. G., & Behm, V. A. Y. (2020). Toward the definition of personalized nutrition: a proposal by the American Nutrition Association. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 39(1), 5-15. https://doi.org/10.1080/07315724.2019.1685332 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2022, October 14). Health and economic costs of chronic diseases. https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/about/costs/index.htm El Khoury, C. F., Karavetian, M., Halfens, R. J., Crutzen, R., Khoja, L., & Schols, J. M. (2019). The effects of dietary mobile apps on nutritional outcomes in adults with chronic diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 119(4), 626-651. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2018.11.010 Houser. (2023). Nursing research: Reading, using and creating evidence (5th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Learning. Neuhouser, M. L. (2019). The importance of healthy dietary patterns in chronic disease prevention. Nutrition Research, 70, 3-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2018.06.002

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

Order Paper Now
Writerbay.net

When writing your assignment, we aim to help you get an A, not just beat the deadline.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper