For our first discussion, I will engage you with an age-old debate on artist copyright. The text introduced Chicago’s “Cloud Gate” public art and the later controversy that emerged when a photographer

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For our first discussion, I will engage you with an age-old debate on artist copyright. The text introduced Chicago’s “Cloud Gate” public art and the later controversy that emerged when a photographer documented the artwork and released the images online. For context, I have copied/pasted the relevant portion of the text below. Please read it and let me know your personal thoughts on the below question –

If public art is public (and sometimes supported in real dollars by the public), where, in your opinion, should the artist’s rights end and the public’s begin?

Context from your textbook below:

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Chicago’s Millennium Park has its own very popular and very new gathering space, the focal point of which is Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate ( Fig. 11.38 ). Nicknamed “the bean” because of its elliptical, beanlike shape, the work consists of highly polished, mirror-like stainless steel plates that reflect the people, places, and things surrounding it, both permanent and transient. Kapoor has called his piece “a gate to Chicago, a poetic idea about the city it reflects.” The work inspired a new jazz composition (Fanfare for Cloud Gate) by Orbert Davis, performed in Millennium Park on the occasion of the dedication of Kapoor’s sculpture.

A bit of controversy surrounding Cloud Gate proves interesting with regard to the nature of land and environmental art, including commissioned public works of art. Kapoor owns the rights to the piece, and therefore photographs of it cannot be reproduced commercially (as in this book) without his permission. One particular photographer learned this the hard way, when he was not permitted to photograph “the bean” without a prepaid permit. The public response to limits on publishing personal photographs of this public work of art was strong; photographs began to appear all over the Internet (you can find them on Google Images or Flickr, a photo-sharing website). If public art is public (and sometimes supported in real dollars by the public), where, in your opinion, should the artist’s rights end and the public’s begin?

For our first discussion, I will engage you with an age-old debate on artist copyright. The text introduced Chicago’s “Cloud Gate” public art and the later controversy that emerged when a photographer
4/18/23, 1:08 PM Topic: Discussion W eek 12 – If public art is public, where should artist’s rights end and the public’s begin? https://unioncc.instructure.com/courses/48318/discussion_topics/495395?module_item_id=31 17089 1/3  This is a graded discussion: 5 points possible due Apr 19 Discussion W eek 12 – If public art is public, where should artist’s rights end and the public’s begin? 1 1 Dire ctio ns 1. For your Initial Post due by Wednesday 11:59 PM : For our first discussion, I will engage you with an age-old debate on artist copyright. The text introduced Chicago’s “Cloud Gate” public art and the later controversy that emerged when a photographer documented the artwork and released the images online. For context, I have copied/pasted the relevant portion of the text below. Please read it and let me know your personal thoughts on the below question – If public art is public (and sometimes supported in real dollars by the public), where, in your opinion, should the artist’s rights end and the public’s begin? Context from your textbook below: Chicago’s Millennium Park has its own very popular and very new gathering space, the focal point of which is Anish Kapoor ’s Cloud Gate ( Fig. 1 1.38 ). Nicknamed “the bean” because of its elliptical, beanlike shape, the work consists of highly polished, mirror-like stainless steel plates that reflect the people, places, and things surrounding it, both permanent and transient. Kapoor has called his piece “a gate to Chicago, a poetic idea about the city it reflects.” The work inspired a new jazz composition (Fanfare for Cloud Gate) by Orbert Davis, performed in Millennium Park on the occasion of the dedication of Kapoor’s sculpture. A bit of controversy surrounding Cloud Gate proves interesting with regard to the nature of land and environmental art, including commissioned public works of art. Kapoor owns the rights to the piece, and therefore photographs of it cannot be reproduced commercially (as in this book) without his permission. One particular photographer learned this the hard way , when he was not permitted to photograph “the bean” without a prepaid permit. The public response to limits on publishing personal photographs of this public work of art was strong; photographs began to appear all over the Internet (you can find them on Google Images or Flickr , a photo-sharing website). If public art is public (and sometimes supported in real dollars by the public), where, in your opinion, should the artist’s rights end and the public’s begin? [Hit reply button to answer] 4/18/23, 1:08 PM Topic: Discussion W eek 12 – If public art is public, where should artist’s rights end and the public’s begin? https://unioncc.instructure.com/courses/48318/discussion_topics/495395?module_item_id=31 17089 2/3 Search entries or author Discu ssio n G uid elin es As you read and respond to others’ posts, keep in mind some basic rules for netiquette (h ttp ://w ww.a lb io n.c o m /n etiq uette /c o re ru le s.h tm l) : Be kind and respectful to others Use full sentences Don’t use too much jargon T reat others online as you wish to be treated Use language that supports others 2. For your Response to at least 2 classmates due by Thursday , 11:59 PM: Review a few summaries left by classmates. Read what they have to say and build on that. They will share new perspectives and help you to consider the artwork more deeply . Choose two summaries to add additional comments onto. Here are some examples of ways you can respond to classmates – “Wow, I did not think of x and now it makes me think of y”, “I do not agree with your interpretation of the content/concept because of x and y that I am seeing visually”, “I agree with your interpretation. To build on that same line of thinking, have you considered x?” W e need to make sure comments are professional and constructive. Have fun class! Unread  

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