Choose any one story, create an argument about how the story explores a modern concern or development related to contemporary science and technology — through the literary genre of the short story. 1

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Choose any one story, create an argument about how the story explores a modern concern or development related to contemporary science and technology — through the literary genre of the short story.

1) https://dailysciencefiction.com/science-fiction/biotech/thomas-k-carpenter/ten-things-you-should-know-before-crossing-yourself-with-a-lobster-so-you-can-live-forever

2) https://dailysciencefiction.com/science-fiction/robots-and-computers/alexei-collier/apocalist-the-surprising-origins-of-7-everyday-words

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3) https://dailysciencefiction.com/science-fiction/clones/christine-amsden/please-stop-murdering-grandma

4)https://dailysciencefiction.com/science-fiction/biotech/kara-allen/i-love-you-and-i-have-the-brain-scans-to-prove-it

Do not simply discuss or summarize the plot and do not simply argue that the story reflects some particular concern. Similarly, don’t simply say that the science in the story is implausible in some way. Instead, make an argument about how the story develops a theme related to modern science. Explore its literary richness as it relates to real scientific concerns. Do not try to make the analysis easy. Aim to explore the difficulties.  Remember to use footnotes, not endnotes.

Chicago style must be used.

Criteria for Recognition

Is within 10% of the assigned length, not including footnotes and front matter, and without excessive quotation.

Is formatted according to course guidelines (font, inclusion of course info, margins etc).

Has an original title (eg not “English essay” or “Assignment One” or the like).

Has an introduction that sets out a relevant thesis—in this case a statement about the story engages, thematically, some issue of modern science.

Has a series of body paragraphs that present relevant arguments and relevant evidence. Each body paragraph should include properly cited evidence from the story and, in some cases, from secondary sources.

Has a conclusion.

Has a reasonably limited number of typos and errors of grammar and style. Students should note that not every error will be noted in feedback. Just fixing the errors noted may not be enough to satisfy this requirement.

Uses footnotes for citations without a bibliography and uses them correctly according to Chicago Style and course guidelines.

Choose any one story, create an argument about how the story explores a modern concern or development related to contemporary science and technology — through the literary genre of the short story. 1
Do not simply discuss or summarize the plot and do not simply argue that the story reflects some particular concern. Similarly, don’t simply say that the science in the story is implausible in some way. Instead, make an argument about how the story develops a theme related to modern science. Explore its literary richness as it relates to real scientific concerns. Do not try to make the analysis easy. Aim to explore the difficulties. Try to organize your essays based on your arguments. Do not simply go through the story paragraph by paragraph. You must do some secondary research on the modern science issues. Don’t just provide information to fill up space in the paper. Use the science as context and evidence for the interpretation of the story.  The idea is to say that modern science involves us in a particular and interesting debate: here is how this short story participates in that debate. Here is what it wants us to consider or conclude. Further, do not seek out others’ interpretations of the story; the interpretation should be yours. Essays should be double spaced with at least 1-inch margins. Use a sans-serif font such as Calibri, not a serif font like Times New Roman. New paragraphs should be indicated with an indent, not a space. Essays should list your name, the course code and section, and the date at the top left of the first page. Essays should have a title centred over the main text, but not a separate title page. Remember to use footnotes, not endnotes. Submit the paper as a Word (.doc or .docx) file. Required length: 1200 words, not including footnotes or front matter. Criteria for Recognition [Feedback for this paper will include an indication as to which criteria have been met.] Is within 10% of the assigned length, not including footnotes and front matter, and without excessive quotation. Is formatted according to course guidelines (font, inclusion of course info, margins etc). Has an original title (eg not “English essay” or “Assignment One” or the like). Has an introduction that sets out a relevant thesis—in this case a statement about the story engages, thematically, some issue of modern science. Has a series of body paragraphs that present relevant arguments and relevant evidence. Each body paragraph should include properly cited evidence from the story and, in some cases, from secondary sources. Has a conclusion. Has a reasonably limited number of typos and errors of grammar and style. Students should note that not every error will be noted in feedback. Just fixing the errors noted may not be enough to satisfy this requirement. Uses footnotes for citations without a bibliography and uses them correctly according to Chicago Style and course guidelines. Distinction Distinction can be earned with particularly brilliant discussion and analysis.
Choose any one story, create an argument about how the story explores a modern concern or development related to contemporary science and technology — through the literary genre of the short story. 1
Nota R. Person 156 97785 ENGL 110 2:12 March 1, 2023 Never as Go od as New: Rebec ca Lang and Pro blem of Super -longe vity The q uestion implied in the t itle of Rebecca Lang ’s short story “What No One Ever Tel ls You About Becoming Immortal ” is answered , in a way, i n the story ’s final line: “Eventually , you d ie.”1 This ending, of course, presents the reader with a par ado x: how can one die if o ne is immort al? Immorta lity is, by definition the inab ility to die. It is this paradox that the story explores and through wh ich it develops its comment on the potential pitfalls of using our ra pidly advancing te chnol ogy to vastly prolong our lifespan s. Thro ugh the case of Diann, Lang prese nts a stark w arning about the dange rs of ex tending human life through advanced technolog ies, the most devastating of which is that we cannot really extend human life at all. Some of the problems that Diann faces as she s eeks to evade nat ural death are pragmatic difficulties that most people could probably anticipate , and , to some extent, tha t some people face today even with ordinary medical treatment . For one thing, the treatments are expe nsive and create an enormous financial burden on D iann, and presumably many others. To get s tarted, Diann and her husband have to “dip into their savings ” (21). Later , it becomes clear that the “dip ” has become a n all out draining of their savings because later we learn t hat the treatmen ts have left Diann “deep in debt ” (30). The ongoing financial hardship makes se nse in Lang ’s future world becau se the super -longe vity that Diann pursues is not a matter of a single proc edure. Her cancer is cured through “cutting edge ” (5) nanotechnology a nd that measure seems to provide ongoing rege neration of her internal o rgans, but even that technology r equires fre quent updates , which in turn requ ire more , apparently expe nsive, injections (8) . Eve n worse, th e nano -tech does not reg enerate her bones, so s he eventually requires a new skeleton . She is assured that the new bones will be like the ones she had w hen she was twenty, but this observation occasions a cru cial insight on Diann ’s part: “I’m not tw enty [ …] these bones don ’t fit me anymore ” (14). Here, Diann be gin s to realize that her pr ocess has gone b eyond medical treatment: her physical is being replaced . She is not exact ly becoming someone else ; she is the s ame person living in someone else ’s body. She can never be, she notes “good as new ” because she cannot be new at all (6 -7) As Diann advances in chrono logical years , she finds herself unable to age with grace and dignity since her youthful life i s expect ed to continue in a girlish form that even her own granddau ghter envies (22) . But psychologicall y, she remains herself and is unable to cope with the changes around her . She increasingly cannot meet the demands of employment , for example, because “her wo rk skill s are nearly obsolete ” (30). Mor e troubling, and like many others, she finds herself among the “old immortals ” who “can ’t keep up with new techn ology, new people, new ways of life ” (29). Diann and those like her , Lang implies, have minds designed fo r a single lif etime , and can not cope with more than one lifetime ’s worth of experience. 1 Rebecca Lang, “What No One Ever Tells You About Becoming Immortal ,” Daily Science Fiction , Se ptember 4, 2014. https://dailysciencefiction.com/science -fiction/biotech/rebecca -lang/what -no-one -ever -tells -you -about -becoming – immortal , para 39. Subs equent references to this story will be g iven by paragraph number in parentheses. Commented [TP1]: Chicago -style note. For a literary work that you are goin g to be citing repea tedly , you can indicate that you are going to use parenthetical citations for the rest of the essay. For most works, sub sequent citatio ns shou ld be in a short -form note. Commented [TP2]: End your introductory paragraph with a clear thesis . Do not i nclude a summary of what is to come. Commented [TP3]: Avoid contractions in formal prose, except in quotations. Commented [TP4]: Ground your discussion i n the details in the text. Some things can be paraphrased, but you should quote frequently. Notice that you of ten need only a few words of quotation to ma ke the point. In this way, Lang warn s, advanced longevity tech nology has the potential to rob its use rs of their fundamental humanity . Diann seems to sense this early on in her medical journey, likening hers elf to “Frankenst ein ’s monster stitched together from different parts ” (16). Like the mo nster in the story, Diann increasingly comes to real ize that she has no place in the world of n atural humanity. Her loss of humanity is fore shadowed by her husband ’s lo ss of hi s memory and thus h is entire pers onal history and person ality. Diann is forced through the ordeal of being married to a man she effect ively doe s not know . It is one thing to have to care for an a ging partner, but Diann ’s humiliation i n having to see her husband, now, effectively a teena ger, “flirt with classmates ” (26-27). Diann gets a divorce (28) , but, in a sense, she becomes a wid ow, because the man her husband was no longer exists. This same fate awaits Diann herself who eventually cannot deal with wit h the w eight of her own exper iences , and she feels compelled to u ndergo yet another surgery, this time to erase her m emory . In so doing she, like her h usband before her, loses connection to her past and thus her self. This loss is sym bolized in a crucial moment late in story when , aft er the surgery, she confronts what she has previously ackno wledged as the “trea sures ” of her long life (31) . These are no t things of m onetary va lue, but rather items that em body the most imp ortant da ys of her existence, i ncluding her wedding dress and her diaries (31) . After the surgery, sh e regards those treasures as “junk ” and gets rid of them (36) . With them go the life that she once had . That Diann , that human being, is gone. This is wh y the story ends with the paradox that the immortals eventually die . The res olution of the paradox is that they die not in body , but in spir it. The person you were cannot endure forever . We are meant to di e as part of the natural progression of lif e—whatever lies your doct or may tell you in the future. Commented [TP5]: Paragraphs should be gin with a claim that supp orts the thesis . Then, pr esent ev idence. Don’t start with quotations and later comment on them. Commented [TP6]: Notice that this essay doe s not have five paragraphs because the structure of t he argument does not call for five.
Choose any one story, create an argument about how the story explores a modern concern or development related to contemporary science and technology — through the literary genre of the short story. 1
1 Pratham Jhamb 0291393 ENG -1109 June 4 , 2023 EXPLORING ETHICAL BOUNDARIES The literary work entitled “Please Stop Maundering Grandma,” penned by Christine Amsden , delves into contemporary concerns surrounding the intersection of technology and science. Amsden scrutinizes the ethical implications of cloning and surveillance by utilizing the literary genre of the short story, thereby shedding light on the potential consequences and ethical dilemmas arising from these modern technological innovations 1. This essay will focus on the themes of surveillance and cloning as depicted in the short story , with the aim of examining the complexities that arise when considering the interplay between science and ethics within a literary context. In Amsdens’ tale, Grandma’s promise to murder her clones in punishment for Susie’s comma abuse introduces the concept of cloning. This story point emphasizes questions about 1 Amsden, Christine. n.d. Please Stop Murdering Grandma. Accessed June 4, 2023. https://dailysciencefiction.com/science -fiction/clones/christine -amsden/please -stop – murdering -grandma . Commented [TP1]: Be careful to get titles right Commented [TP2]: This is a claim about the interpretation of the story so it doesn ’t make sense to cite the story here. And this citation is not correctly formatted. R eview Chicago style Commented [TP3]: Still too broad: better is to make a strong claim about what the story is doing. Commented [TP4]: This is where you would want a citation. When you ’re citing details from the story. 2 cloning ethics and how it affects human identity and autonomy 2(4) . Cloning is utilized as a metaphor in the story for scientific discoveries that put traditional views about family relationships and reproduction to the test . Because of Amsden’s studies on the subject , readers are invited to consider the moral implications of cloning and the potential consequences of messing with the body’s regular reproductive process . Amsden’s narrative employs the concept of cloning as a thought -provoking metaphor to explore the ethic al boundaries of reproduction. The narrative draws a connection between Susie’s grammatical errors and the presence of Grandma’s clones, thereby prompting readers to contemplate the ethical implications of cloning and its potential impact on individual age ncy and selfhood. The narrative prompts us to contemplate the potential consequences of interfering with innate reproductive mechanisms, raising apprehensions regarding the sacredness of existence and the boundaries of scientific interference 3 (98). 2 Chan, David K. “The concept of human dignity in the ethics of genetic research.” Bioethics 29, no. 4 (2015): 274 -282. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bioe.1210 2 3 Benagiano, Giuseppe, and Paola B ianchi. “Human reproductive cloning.” In Hot Topics in Human Reproduction: Ethics, Law and Society. Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2023. https://link.springer.com/chapt er/10.1007/978 -3-031 -24903 -7_8 Commented [TP5]: Not clear why y ou would be citing a philosophic al source here since this is another claim about the story. Further, a footnote needs to cite the specific page that you ’re citing, not the full article. How is the reader to know where to find the material you are citing? Still further, this link is not to a n accessible full art icle – sources have to be fully accessible. If it ’s avai lable through JSTOR or another database that our library accesses, you could cit e it that way. Commented [TP6]: Vague. Commented [TP7]: Not clear what this mean . Commented [TP8]: Again, too va gue. It ’s not enough to just suggest ideas that the story might imply – you need to dig into the details of the text and pro vide r eal analysis. Commented [TP9]: Again, you can’t just keep saying explo re and contemplate etc. You have to make some real assertions about what the story does and how it does it. And you have to quote and cite sp ecific details. Commented [TP10]: You have to make it clear how you are using sources. You can ’t just include a citation without any expla nation of what you’re drawing and why its relevant. Further , the article is not fully av ailable. 3 Another issue explored in “Please Stop Murdering Grandma” is monitoring, which is shown by Grandma’s admission that her daughters’ skulls had tracking implants . The narrative highlights the conflict between advancing technology and the right to personal pr ivacy 4 (24) . The story’s depiction of invasive monitoring acts as a warning, highlighting the possible loss of privacy in a society that is becoming increasingly technologically adept. This storytelling device asks readers to reflect on the limits of ethi cal monitoring and the harmony between personal freedom and security. The tale by Amsden dives deeply into the subject of monitoring, highlighting the possible loss of privacy in a society dominated by technological progress. The discovery of monitoring de vices within the skulls of Grandma’s kids serves as a striking reminder of how invasive surveillance is and how it affects people’s right to privacy. The novel explores essential issues about the legal restrictions on monitoring and the precarious equilibr ium between personal freedom and security via this narrative aspect. The narrative emphasizes the pervasiveness of monitoring and its ability to violate people’s privacy rights by showing how Grandma always knew where her daughters were 5 (37) . The image o f the monitoring gadgets in their heads represents a loss of physical autonomy and individuality . The risks of unrestrained 4 Weber, Rolf H. “Internet of Things –New security and privacy challenges.” Computer law & security review 26, no. 1 (2010): 23 -30. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S026736490900193 9 5 West, Sarah Myers. “Data capitalism: Redefining the logics of surveillance and privacy.” Business & society 58, no. 1 (2019). https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/000765031771818 5 Commented [TP11]: Needs a citation. Commented [TP12]: Once again , it doesn ’t make sense to cite this source here. It feels lik e you ’re just sticking citations in arbitrarily. That ’s not research. You have to actually use the sources. And again, not ci ted correctly and not av ailable generally. Commented [TP13]: Citation? Commented [TP14]: Not a novel. Commented [TP15]: Needs to be place d in the larger context of the s tory. 4 monitoring and the possibility of totalitarian regimes that intrude on people’s private lives are highlighted by this narrative choi ce. Readers are challenged to critically assess the moral ramifications of technical breakthroughs that permit ongoing surveillance as a result of Amsden’s investigation of surveillance in the narrative. It forces us to think about the compromises between security and individual privacy as well as the possible repercussions of giving up control over our personal data. In an increasingly linked society, the narrative serves as a warning, reminding us of the necessity to set clear boundaries and security meas ures to preserve individual privacy 6(1) . The narrative also encourages consideration of the power relations present in surveillance. The fact that Grandma is aware of the location of her daughters leads to an imbalance of power within the family. The accountability and responsibility of people in monitoring positions are called into question by this dynamic. It challenges readers to think about how surveillance technology could be misused and abused, highlighting the need for solid ethical frameworks a nd protections to avoid the violation of individual rights. The ramifications of technology dependency and the possible loss of real human connection are discussed in the novel obliquely 7(416) . Amsden depicts a culture where 6 Fung, Benjamin CM, Ke Wang, Rui Chen, and Philip S. Yu. “Privacy -preserving data publishing: A survey of recent developments.” ACM Computing Surveys (Csur) 42, no. 4 (2010): 1 -53. https://dl.acm.org/doi/abs/10. 1145/1749603.174960 5 7 Knapp, Mark L., Judith A. Hall, and Terrence G. Horgan. Nonverbal communication in human interaction. Cengage Learning, 2013. https://books.google.co.ke/books?hl=en&lr=&i d=rWoWAAAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=Kn app,+Mark+L.,+Judith+A.+Hall,+and+Terrence+G.+Horgan.+Nonverbal+communication+in+ human+interaction.+Cengage+Learning,+2013.&ots=4SvASPpYcx&sig= – 5 technology has become necessar y for communication via comedy and sarcasm, as seen by Susie’s decision to write a letter rather than send an email. This novel element prompts readers to consider how technology affects interpersonal connections and how it can diminish the value of face -to-face conversations. The ethical ramifications of choosing technology ease for true human connection pose significant challenges. Amsden’s narrative delicately discusses the ramifications of technology reliance and the possible loss of genuine human conne ction. The story uses satire and comedy to portray a world in which technology has taken over most forms of communication 8(4, 5). Susie’s choice to write a letter rather than send an email is a moving statement on the declining importance of in-person con nections in today’s society. The narrative encourages readers to consider how technology has affected interpersonal connections and how it can eventually diminish the value of true human connection. Amsden’s depiction of Susie’s letter -writing as a wonderf ul surprise underscores the rarity of personal, physical means of communication in a culture that pE22xwpGnlrpIhquOF1LUMpHI8&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=Knapp%2C%20Mark%20L.% 2C%20J udith%20A.%20Hall%2C%20and%20Terrence%20G.%20Horgan.%20Nonverbal% 20communication%20in%20human%20interaction.%20Cengage%20Learning%2C%202013 .&f=fals e 8 Ling, Richard. New tech, new ties: How mobile communication is reshaping social cohesion. MIT press, 201 0. https://books.google.co.ke/books?hl=en&lr=&id=J57uDwAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PT5&dq=Ling ,+Richard.+New+tech,+new+ties:+How+mobile+communication+is+reshaping+social+cohes ion.+MIT+press,+2010.&ots=22NgW1cpwA&sig=1e8xYj1FxC6YUZTOOw0rnc16BSE&redir_ esc=y#v=onepage&q=Ling%2C%20Richard.%20New%20tech%2C%20new%20ties%3A%2 0How%20mobile%20communication%2 0is%20reshaping%20social%20cohesion.%20MIT% 20press%2C%202010.&f=false 6 prioritizes ease and immediate satisfaction. Readers are prompted to think about the moral ramifications of choosing technological convenience over the more m eaningful ties that may be cultivated via face -to-face engagement by this narrative choice. In conclusion, w ith a particular emphasis on the moral ramifications of cloning and monitoring, “Please Stop Murdering Grandma” offers a literary analysis of contem porary issues concerning science and technology. The moral ambiguities surrounding cloning, the erosion of privacy owing to monitoring, and the possible loss of personal connection due to technology dependency are all stimulated by Amsden’s narrative. The narrative challenges readers to consider the moral ambiguities brought on by contemporary technological discoveries by using comedy and sarcasm. It underlines how carefully and responsibly science and technology should be incorporated into our daily lives. 7 Second Essay: Science Fiction and Science Fact Recognition Criteria Criterion Met? Notes Within 10% of the assigned length, not including footnotes and front matter, and without excessive quotation. No Too short Formatted according to guidelines (font, inclusion of course info, margins etc). Yes Has an original title. Yes Has an introduction that sets out a relevant thesis —in this case a statement about the story engages, thematically, some issue of modern science . Yes Has a series of body paragraphs that present relevant arguments and relevant evidence. Each body paragraph should include properly cited evidence from the story and, in some cases, from secondary sources. No Little or no quotation from the s tory Story not cited Sources not really used. Citations seem arbitrary and are cited in place s that don ’t make sense. Sources not appropriate because of accessib ility. Has a conclusion. Yes Has a reasonably limited number of typos and errors of grammar and style. Yes Uses correct footnotes for citations without a bibliography according to CMS , course guidelines. No Sources not cited in correct format Page numbers not given for sources Overall assessment Submitted Essays may be rewritten once. When submitting a rewrite, be sure to clearly identify in the file name that it is a rewrite. All rewrites MUST be evidently a new version of the old paper, even if much improved. Rewrites may NOT be entirely new papers. 8

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